Blog Tour · Books · Historical Fiction · Review

#BlogTour |The Shogun’s Queen by @LesleyDowner #BookReview

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It is my pleasure to be on the blog tour for this book.  “The Shogun’s Queen” by Lesley Downer. Part of a series called “The Shogun’s Quartet”,

My Thoughts:

This story is based in Japan during 1851-1858, a period in history when Japan is under threat from America and Britain.  Although they trade with Holland successfully, the other countries want to set up ports and bases on the island, making more demands and wanting treaties signed.  As this is going on the main story takes place, that of a young girl from the Satsuma Province at the south of the island,  her name is Okatsu and she has been chosen for an important role.  Her family has ideas that a country girl from a notable family can be elevated to the Imperial Palace in the north. She has absolutely no say in her future at all.

Lesley has created a historical fiction novel with a huge amount of detail, culture, customs, traditions, history, social class and values from Japanese life. As you read through this story, it is easy to notice the time effort and research that has been put into this, what also comes across for me is , is that the author has an obvious  love for this country and it’s people.  For me what I found great about this book is the amount of things I learnt from it, I have a basic knowledge of Japan and its history, but this book goes a lot further.  The formalities and workings at the palace for a young girl entering this isolated and secluded world amazed me.  I loved the fact that a lot of the main characters actually existed.  The descriptions Lesley has given of each character and the way she has described the country is wonderful.

There are some really handy inclusions in this book to aid the reader, maps, a list of characters and their roles and a very insightful afterward. In the afterward she explains how a lot of the characters actually existed, they can be researched.  Also how she did take liberties with some things.  But the vast majority of the book is nearly true to fact.

I have thoroughly enjoyed this book, I found it a very addictive and easy read given the amount of detail that is included.

This is my first encounter with this amazing and talented author, it will not be my last.  I highly recommend this book for readers of historical fiction

 

Book Synopsis:

The year is 1853, and a young Japanese girl’s world is about to be turned upside down.

When black ships carrying barbarians arrive on the shores of Japan, the Satsuma clan’s way of life is threatened. But it’s not just the samurai who must come together to fight: the beautiful, headstrong Okatsu is also given a new destiny by her feudal lord – to save the realm.

Armed only with a new name, Princess Atsu, as she is now known, journeys to the women’s palace of Edo Castle, a place so secret it cannot be marked on any map. Behind the palace’s immaculate façade, amid rumours of murder and whispers of ghosts, Atsu must uncover the secret of the man whose fate, it seems, is irrevocably linked to hers – the shogun himself – if she is to rescue her people . . .

 

Lesley Downer Bio

I write historical fiction set in Japan – women’s untold stories, largely true and based on meticulous and detailed research, though primarily, of course, good yarns. I’ve just finished The Shogun’s Queen, the fourth of The Shogun Quartet, four novels set in the nineteenth century during the tumultuous fifteen years when Japan was convulsed by civil war and transformed from rule by the shoguns into a society that looked to the west.

The second, The Last Concubine, was shortlisted for Romantic Novel of the Year 2009 and translated into 30 languages. The other two novels are The Courtesan and the Samurai and The Samurai’s Daughter. My non-fiction on Japan includes Geisha: The Remarkable Truth Behind the Fiction and Madame Sadayakko: The Geisha who Seduced the West. I’m also a journalist and travel writer, give lectures and teach Creative Writing at City University in London.

Website:  Lesley Downer
Twitter:  @LesleyDowner
Facebook:  AuthorLesleyDowner

 

Book Details:

 

  • Paperback: 544 pages
  • Publisher: Corgi; 01 edition (27 July 2017)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 055216349X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0552163491

 

Thank you taking the time to read my blog.

 

Action and Adventure · Blog Tour · Books · Children's

The Shield: The Finders Series: Book One by @CJBentleyAuthor #Blogtour #QandA #Review

The Shield 3 pencil sketch

I am pleased to be taking part in the Blog Tour for The Shield by author C.J.Bentley The Shield. The release date 18th July 2017 and published by Clink Street Publishing.  The first in a series of books, I am already waiting for more.

A massive thank you to Rachel Gilbey for giving me a spot on this tour, I have enjoyed the journey immensely. I would also like to thank C.J. Bentley for taking the time to answer a few questions, they can be seen below.

MY THOUGHTS:

This book begins in Durham in 1340, with a knight laying injured whilst on a mission of delivering an important letter to King Edward III.  It then switches to 1962, a young girl Peggy and a group of friends find a shield while out exploring in their school summer holidays.

Peggy’s world is going to change, she will have the biggest adventure she could ever have imagined.  The adventure of your wildest dreams is actually going to be a reality. She has a destiny to uphold, a kingdom and a King to help save, a Lady to rescue and all will take place in 1340 England.

Plots, plans and schemes are plentiful in this book, will Peggy be able to complete her destined quest and reunite the shield with its rightful owner ?

As an adult reading this book, I was taken back to my childhood days, summer holidays described in this book are how I used to spend my time, though I never found a shield. Because I was taken back by the story, it made me think about all the books I used to read as a child. If I had been given this one to read I would have been beside myself with excitement.  It really would have appealed to me.

I loved everything about this book, the story was well thought out and executed.  There was no confusion over characters or settings. I think it would be a brilliant book for children to read, as it kept me engrossed as an adult.

Also at the end of the book was a very thoughtful and educational section on the history of York and the Royals at the time.  I think this is a wonderful idea for inclusion, again this section is basic and not overly complicated.

I would recommend this book to readers of Children’s’ fantasy.

BOOK SYNOPSIS:   The Shield

People lose their belongings. That is a fact of life. It can happen by accident, but sometimes it can happen when you put them in a very safe place and forget where that safe place is. Not many people are good at finding them again.
A young, gutsy girl with a kind heart, who’s searching for her own identity growing up in the 1960s, just happens to be very good at finding things. Can she be the one to help return whatever is lost – anywhere and at any time – to its original owner?
With the help of a beautiful yet mysterious wise woman and a chivalrous knight she does just that. She finds and returns his shield, lost in battle, which unbeknown to her holds a secret that is important to his King, the safety of the Kingdom and the life of the daughter of his best friend.
The Shield is the first story in The Finder Series, taking our heroine on extraordinary journeys back in time. Her first adventure takes place in Medieval England in 1340 where she meets King Edward III, his wife Philippa and their son, who will later become the Black Prince.

About the author:

CJBentley_AuthorPhoto2.jpg  Originally heralding from the North of England, C.J Bentley has travelled extensively and enjoyed living in a variety of countries across the world from Dubai to Doha, Qatar and now the countryside in the South of France. A background in teaching and childcare she has always enjoyed creating adventure short stories. However, it was when she became a grandma and with her grandchildren growing up  that she discovered that books seemed to contain only stories of vampires, zombies and farts that she decided seriously to take matters into her own hands and put pen to paper which today she calls The Finder Series.

Website – https://www.cjbentleyonline.co.uk/

Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/CJBentleyAuthor/

Twitter – https://twitter.com/CJBentleyAuthor

Q and A with the author:

  1. Is this how you spent your summer holidays as a child, fishing that is, rather than time travel ? If so, how much of your childhood is in Peggy ?

I think all writers must include some of their experiences within their writing, you have to write about things you know as well as what you can imagine.  As children growing up in the sixties we used to fish for newts and small fish called sticklebacks, jam jars with string handles and nets bought from earlier trips to the seaside in hand.  We were very lucky in that time as children, lots of freedom to roam and play outside during the long summer holidays from school.  A lot of my own experiences are experienced by Peggy, (would that I could have experienced time travel like her). 

  1. What or who sparked you interest in history ?

I have always been interested in history.  I enjoyed reading books about periods of history, “Children of the New Forest” by Captain Marriott being one book I remember enjoying, taking me back in time to the Civil War in England.  Teachers have a huge influence on their pupils, I was lucky to have been taught by some amazing teachers who encouraged my love of reading and my curiosity about history. 

On a visit to Durham Cathedral as a young child I remember pressing my head against the metal bars of a gate leading down stairs to a vault.  A priest who happened to be passing saw me and following a chat he opened the gate and gave quite a few people who had gathered around an impromptu tour of the crypt below and the old roman road leading to the river.  It was a magical experience never forgotten.   

Later, whilst fishing in a local stream myself and a friend found a shield in the silt.  Due to its weight and difficulty in moving it from the silt and there being only two of us we chose to put it back, Peggy chose to pull it free and what happens after is told in “The Shield”.

  1. Who in history would you like to have been able to meet, and why ?

This question is a difficult one to answer as I have so many questions for so many people, a bit like that question, if you could choose six people who would you choose to have to dinner with?   

The obvious person would be Jesus Christ, I have so many questions to ask. 

King Charles the first, again so many questions for this much maligned man. 

Charles Dickens, his legacy being such an insight into the social problems of his time with his books. 

Martin Luther King, his words were the inspiration for a generation, I could go on …. 

I am currently being fascinated by my research on Ibn Batutta for book four in the series, “The Ring”.  He is a little known but fascinating intellect, explorer and traveller, originally from Morocco, who lived during the fourteenth century.  He travelled extensively throughout the Middle East to Africa, Sri Lanka, China, India, The Maldives, in fact probably further than the better known traveller Marco Polo. 

  1. What was your favourite book as a child ?

Again this is such a difficult question to answer because as a child I read extensively and was lucky to have a set of the classics bought as a Christmas present by my parents.  Kidnapped, Children of the New Forest, The Coral Island were all firm favourites but I think the one book, if I have to chose just one, would be “The Wind in the Willows” by Kenneth Graham.  As a year five pupil one of my inspirational teachers, Miss Allen, read from this book on a Friday afternoon.  She was a wonderfully dramatic reader, each character  given a different voice.  She took us to the river bank with Ratty, the middle of the road when Toad fell in love with cars, to Toad Hall and the attempted take over by the weasels, badger who was so very wise.  We all sat enthralled for the last half hour, if we had been especially good during the week and finished our work for her she would extend the reading by another half an hour, what an incentive was that.

  1. I see from your blog you have grandchildren, did you write this book with them in mind as the primary readers, or was writing a book something you always wanted to do?

Yes we have three grandchildren, two girls, now aged fifteen and thirteen and a boy aged eleven.  I have always written short stories, I remember writing one for the eldest when she was two and refusing to wear a beautiful white silk dress which had to be pulled over her head for her Aunts wedding.  I wrote a story for our son to read to her about her being able to wear her favourite blue dinosaur wellies under the dress as a secret thinking this might work.  He read it, it didn’t, she screamed as they held her arms down and forced said dress over her head.  The screams changed to smiles once she caught sight of her mirrored reflection and she became the most photographed person at the wedding, a pretty little one with huge eyes and long curly hair, whirling around in her beautiful dress.

I have always taken notes, a small notebook kept in my handbag and when thoughts occurred hastily added in the book with my observations of human nature.  I spend a lot of time waiting around in airports and they are an excellent source for people watching. 

Our grandchildren visit us in France each summer and having read our way through the saved children’s books we have down here with them I tried to find a story online to read to our grandson, he was nine at the time.  I couldn’t find a story for a nine year old boy that didn’t feature Zombies, vampires or farts, in my mind not good bedtime reading for a nine year old boy.  This was the moment when I decided to write my gathered ideas into story form and having moved to Qatar with my husband’s job, where I decided not to work, I finally had the time to do so.

 

Thank you for taking the time to read my blog.

 

 

 

Blog Tour · Books · Crime / Mystery · Review

#BlogTour #BookReview @Orendabooks : Dying to Live by Michael Stanley @detectivekubu

Published by Orenda Books41nOG-aCIyL._SX324_BO1,204,203,200_

It is my pleasure to participate in the blog tour on July 17th for this book,  “Dying to Live” by Michael Stanley, published on 30th July by Orenda Books  My thanks to Anne Cater for allowing me spot on the tour for this book.

 

This is the 6th instalment of The Detective Kubu Books by the writing duo of Michael Sears and Stanley Trollip.

MY THOUGHTS :  Detective David “Kubu” Bengu is called to investigate the death of a bushman.  Initial thoughts of natural death are soon changed to murder, with further investigation of the body.  The bushman is somethnig of a mystery, his internal organs do not match his exterior.  As the investigation progresses, Kubu realises there is far more to this case than meets the eye, especially when the body is stolen.  Kubu has a good team to help with this ever confusing and ever-changing case.    Samantha Kharma is the first female detective in the branch of Botswanna CID and along with Constable Ixau, a bushman, they will have to use all of their previous knowledge and experience to discover the truth surrounding the death.   Do not for one moment think that this story is just about a murder.  It is a lot bigger and more involved than you could ever imagine.

I have never read any books by this writing duo before, so had no prior expectations, but was very intrigued by the synopsis.  It works very well as a stand alone read, leaving me wanting to read more.  This is a great detective story discussing various other topics, these have been cleverly woven into the main story. The story is set out in quick chapters to a very satisfying end.  The characters were very memorable and well-developed, they show good traits.

There are several things I really enjoyed and found useful in this book.  One of those was that after I finished this book, was the amount I had learnt, for example “Kubu” is the Setswana word for hippopotamus, Setswana is the language of the people of Botswana.  Also various cultural aspects and traditions were discussed, making a very insightful read.  Some very useful inclusions in this book are an informative glossary at the end of the book, basic, but invaluable.  Also a list of characters and their roles that is included at the beginning.

I would recommend this book to readers of crime and mystery genres.  Also adding that there are cultural themes, if like me you know nothing much of this country.

BOOK DETAILS :

Published by Orenda Books

EBook
ISBN 978-1-910633-77-9
RRP £5.99
Published 15 July 2017
Paperback
ISBN 978-1-910633-76-2
RRP £8.99
Published 15 July 2017

ABOUT THE AUTHORS:

thumbnail_Michael Stanley photo

Michael Stanley is the writing team of Michael Sears and Stanley Trollip. Both were
born in South Africa and have worked in academia and business. On a flying trip to
Botswana, they watched a pack of hyenas hunt, kill, and devour a wildebeest,
eating both flesh and bones. That gave them the premise for their first mystery, A
Carrion Death, which introduced Detective ‘Kubu’ Bengu of the Botswana Criminal
Investigation Department. It was a finalist for five awards, including the CWA
Debut Dagger. The series has been critically acclaimed, and their third book,
Death of the Mantis, won the Barry Award and was a finalist for an Edgar award.
Deadly Harvest was a finalist for an International Thriller Writers’ award, and book
5, A Death in the Family, was an international bestseller.

 

Blog · Blog Tour · Books · Crime / Mystery · Non Fiction · Review

#Blogtour The Green Bicycle Mystery by Antony.M.Brown #Review

green bike mystThe Green Bicycle Mystery : The Curious Case of Bella Wright by Antony M Brown

I give this book 5 stars. 

I would like to thank Nicola Slavin from Book Machine Works for contacting me about joining the Blog Tour for this book.  “The Green Bicycle Mystery” by Antony M Brown and published by Mirror Books.

MY THOUGHTS:

This book is a little different from most, it is based on a cold case. The reader is asked not just to read the book  but solve the mystery of the case.

The case is that of Bella Wright from Leicestershire in 1919, a case never solved.

The first section of the book gives you the story of Bella and her family, the surrounding area, the scene of the crime and also what happening in Britain at the time.  It was the  end of the first world war, and you are briefly told of how the effects of the war affected people who served and those who remained at home.  Also in this section are account of the crime scene, details of the investigation, witnesses, reports and statements as well as the trial of the suspect.

The second section gives a detailed array of the evidence, timelines for Bella and also the investigation.  Useful maps, autopsy reports, findings, minutes and communiques.

Part three is the author’s view or judgment of the case as well as verdicts from other people.

What initially caught my eye about this book was the interesting synopsis that I was sent.  Once I had read it, my curiosity was piqued by the idea of giving a verdict based on facts that I had read.  Also the historical interest of the area was a big pull for me, it was an area I knew when I lived in Lincolnshire up until 17 years old, so gave me a personal reason for reading.

The book itself is very well laid out and is the author takes you through the facts in a very logical order.  As you progress through the story, the various statements and reports get a little repetitive, but it also adds additional information.  Also it add confirmation to previous statements.

I really enjoyed this book from start to finish; it was a very good page turner.  It gave me a good insight into people’s lives at the time of 1919 and the years just following.  What was interesting was the way police procedures have changed, how investigations are conducted and how local newspapers can influence people.

I would recommend this book to readers of True Crime, Mystery and Historical genres.

SYNOPSIS:

Don’t just read about a murder… solve it. The first of a unique set of true crime dramas. Each one tells the story of an unsolved crime in an evocative and compelling way, it presents fresh evidence, exposes the strengths and weaknesses of past theories and then asks the reader to decide on what happened.

The series begins with the tragic case of Bella Wright. In a lonely lane running through rural Leicestershire in 1919, a solitary bicycle lies on its side, its metal frame catching the glow of the fading evening light. The back wheel slowly turns about its axle, producing a soft clicking; a rhythmic sound, soothing like the ticking of a study clock. Next to the bicycle, lying at an angle across the road, is a young woman. She is partly on her back, partly on her left side, with her right hand almost touching the mudguard of the rear wheel. Her legs rest on the roadside verge, where fronds of white cow parsley and pink rosebay rise above luxuriant summer foliage. On her head sits a wide-brimmed hat, daintily finished with a ribbon and bow. She is dressed in a pastel blouse and long skirt underneath a light raincoat, the pockets of which contain an empty purse and a box of matches. The blood-flecked coat tells a story…

Although each book is perfectly self-contained and offers the author’s conclusion, there is a website (coldcasejury.com) for those who wish to share their own verdicts and opinions, making these the first truly interactive crime tales. Beautifully presented with uniquely illustrated covers they also contain evidence images, diagrams and maps. For lovers of crime stories, this new collection of Cold Case Jury books will not just bring a murder story to life, it will make you a part of it.

 

About Antony M. Brown, author of The Green Bicycle Mystery

AMBS

Antony M. Brown is an award-winning essayist, former magazine editor-in-chief and member of the Crime Writers’ Association. He published several Cold Case Jury e-books – true crime mysteries in which the reader is invited to deliver the verdict on what they believe might have happened – before signing a four book deal with Mirror Books in January 2017.

 

Website: http://www.coldcasejury.com

Blog: http://www.ccjforum.com

Twitter: https://twitter.com/ccjury

Amazon page: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Antony-M.-Brown/e/B019QMY2JW

link to purchase The Green Bicycle Mystery: http://bit.ly/GreenBicycleMystery

 

Blog Tour · Books · Crime / Mystery · Historical Fiction · Review

#Blogtour The Cardinal’s Man by M.G.Sinclair with @bwpublishing and @LinaLanglee

cardin man blogtour

The Cardinal's Man.jpgI would like to thank Lina Langlee for inviting me to take part in the Blogtour of “The Cardinal’s Man” by M.G.Sinclair and published by Black & White Publishing

MY THOUGHTS:

I loved this book immensley, my raing is 5 stars.  This book starts in 1608 in Carmoches, Normandy with the life of Sebastian Morra, born with dwarfism.  We are told of his early life and the prejudice shown because of his differences to other people.  His parents are poor and manual labour is the only work available to him.  But due to his size, his physically unable to complete the majority of tasks.  As the years pass he leaves his village and heads to Paris.

He manages to gain employment in the court of King Louis XIII as a court performer.  His performs in front of royalty, nobility, high ranked, famous and infamous.  Including the notorious Cardinal Richlieu, he becomes an asset to Richlieu, his lack of physical ability does not hold him back, but his intelligence propels him forward.

From poverty, he now mixes in the same environment as the most rich and wealthy and most influential people in the country.  This is where his usefulness comes in, as most people do not even notice him. His world changes as he begins his liaison with Richlieu, Master of deceit, of spies, murder and embezzlement.  Showing Sebastian the behind the scenes view of what happens in decision-making, especially at a time when France is at war, has the plague and is in civil unrest.

The author has changed some timelines in history to make the book more readable, he openly admits this, it is after all a story of historical fiction.  But it works very well to give a very good read.  I really enjoyed this book and was addicted from the first few pages.  The way that the author has used history and given an alternative account of what could have happened is very good.  The characters are mostly known from history and are well-developed, but Sebastian was a wonderful character, at times I felt sorry for him, at other I thought he was cocky and arrogant.

I would highly recommend this book for readers of Historical Fiction, and also crime/mystery readers would probably enjoy this as well.

SYNOPSIS:

A spellbinding story set in Cardinal Richelieu’s France

It’s over a century before the Revolution and France is under siege. The Thirty Years’ War has spread across Europe, alliances are stretched to breaking point and enemies advance on every side. And while Louis XIII sits on the throne, the real power lies with the notorious Cardinal Richelieu.

Now, with Richelieu’s health failing and France in grave danger, salvation may yet be found in the most unlikely form. Sebastian Morra, born into poverty and with terrible deformities, is a dwarf on a mission. Through a mixture of brains and luck, he has travelled far from his village to become a jester at the royal court. And with a talent for making enemies, he is soon drawn into the twilight world of Cardinal Richelieu, where he discovers he might just be the only man with the talents to save France from her deadliest foes.

The Cardinal’s Man is a spellbinding story of France in the time of Richelieu and provides us with a very different kind of hero, a dwarf with the wit of Tyrion Lannister and three foot four inches of brazen pluck.

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

MerlinSinclair2016_1_Credit_Orlando_Gili.jpgThe credit for the author photo is Orlando Gili.

The only child of two writers, M.G. Sinclair grew up in a world that revolved around literature. Breaking the family tradition, he rebelled and joined the corporate world, where he worked as a copywriter and marketing executive. However, unable to escape the inevitable, he has now completed his debut, a historical novel inspired by a trip to the Prado in Madrid.

 

 

BOOK DETAILS:

Published: 11th July 2017
Format: Paperback 198x129mm
Extent: 288 pages
ISBN: 9781785301094
RRP: £8.99

Available from Black and White Publishing

Or as an e-book via Amazon

Thank you for reading my post.

 

 

Action and Adventure · Blog Tour · Books · Fantasy · YA

#BlogTour Discoucia:A Victorianish Fairytale by Nicholas Lovelock @gilbster1000 @Authoright

NicholasLovelock_Banner.jpgNick Lovelock eBook Cover Final 30.5.17.jpg

I am pleased to take part in the Blog Tour for this book on the 12th July for Discoucia by Nicholas Lovelock, published by Clink Street Publishing.

I would like to thank Rachel Gilbey  @Authoright for allowing me a spot on this tour.

MY REVIEW:

This book is like keeping up with road runner on a jet propelled rocket, (in a good way).  It is very fast paced with a huge amount of stories within a story.  This was an enjoyable read, if at times a little confusing due to the huge amount of detail in it.  It has a steam punk style feel to it in places.  A book that will definitely appeal to readers of Teen Fantasy, also enjoyed by an adult reader (me).

Sir Arthur Pageon is a renowned spy, adventurer and explorer, resident of Discoucia and owner of the ship Nostradamus, with only one member of crew Corky.  The High King has asked them to go on a mission that threatens the world of Alavonia, and to take with them his daughter Princess Josephine.  Not your normal princess, she is a member if the Discoucian Secret Service.

The journey will take them across this fantastical world, a world full of mysterious islands, people, monsters and magicians.  Then there is Archie.  The mysterious Archie seems to know what the gang will be doing next, where they will be going and is actually a help, even though she can be a little cryptic.

SYNOPSIS:

Discoucia: A Victorianish Fairytale

Revolution, romance and technological wonders are all in a day’s work for the decorated hero of Alavonia, Sir Arthur Pageon.

An acclaimed explorer and inventor, Sir Arthur Pageon takes his unofficial role as defender of the realm of Alavonia very seriously. A fantastical world, Alavonia is home to the Discoucian Monarchy, as well as monstrous creatures and secretive academies for the highly gifted.
Upon returning from his most recent exploits aboard on his personal flying galleon The Nostradamus, Pageon is treated to a hero’s welcome and celebratory procession through the streets of Alavonia’s capital, Evermore. Little does Pageon know he’s being followed by a mysterious group known as the Purple Guard, whose devious leader is his estranged sister, Queen Lily Pageon of Harrha Island. Fiercely intelligent, Lily specialises in dastardly technological inventions with the aim of bringing down the Discoucian Monarchy so that she may reign as its dictator. However, the heir to the throne is one Princess Josephine Olandine, whose youth and royal position masks her role in the Discoucian Secret Service.

Joining forces, Princess Josephine and Sir Arthur’s adventures will take them across the whole of Alavonia — from the fog-bound shores of Karga, to the secret underground shanty town beneath the frozen prison of Icester, south to the verdant city of Proceur and from there to the affluent Starfall Academy — in their quest to foil Lily’s revolutionary plans.

Purchase from Amazon UK – CLICK HERE FOR AMAZON LINK

 

About the author:

Based in a small village in Oxfordshire Nicholas Lovelock is the author of the Alavonia series. As well as a passion for history, Nick holds a keen interest in Numismatics —the study and collection of coins, banknotes and medals— counting a 200 year-old 1826 half-crown and coinage of monarchs like Queen Anne, Elizabeth the First and Henry the Eighth as part of his collection.

 

Thank you for reading my blog.