#BlogTour : The Prole Soldier by Oliver Tidy @olivertidy @CarolineBookBit #BookReview

The Prole Soldier - Oliver Tidy - Book Cover.jpgI am delighted to finally get my chance to share my thoughts with you on this, the last day of the #BlogTour for “The Prole Soldier” by Oliver Tidy.  My thanks to Oliver for my eARC and also to Caroline for my spot on the tour.  This book is available to purchase in eBook format and can be purchased HERE.

Synopsis:

In Rainbow City your colour counts.

Theo lives and works in the Blue Zone of Rainbow City. He is almost sixteen at which age he will begin four years conscription – military or mines. He wants neither. He hates his life and despises the cruelty, injustice and inequality that prevails. When the opportunity arises for Theo to be involved in the fight for change he grabs it, knowing that failure will cost him everything.

My Thoughts:

The synopsis sums up this book perfectly, the injustice, inequality, cruelty and lack of hope in this brillaint dystopian story.  The first in the Rainbow City series, and what a start it is.  Theo is nearly 16 years old and is due to start a new chapter in his life, that is the rule, that is what must happen.  The only other choice is death! Not a choice as such, but it is a way out some may think about or even choose.

Oliver has written many books, I have some on my TBR and have read only one as part of the Blog Tour last year for “The Fallen Agent” and I thoroughly enjoyed it (this is where i hang my head in shame for not reading more).  The Prole Soldier is a journey into a dystopian world, one where sectors are zones, each zone is a different colour.  The colour of the zone denotes your role in society.  If you think of the zones in “The Hunger Games” series by Suzanne Collins, then you will get a good idea of how this works.  There are many believable aspects to this book and I found similarities to The Handmaidens Tale and also 1984, but the author has brought a new, more up to date and modern feel.  I loved the world through the eyes of Theo who wants more from his life.  He does not want to do what is expected of him, or what Rainbow City dictates. He is a character with hope for something better and has the opportunity to help instigate change.

The story depicts a very real feel to the city and the zones.  The way of life for Theo and those  in the Blue Zone is harsh, basic and very unforgiving.  Yes they have food, clothes, work, electric and the very basic things needed to sustain, but there is a catch.  If you don’t work you don’t eat.  If you are ill and cannot get to work, then you don’t eat. The focus on the social injustice is told in a very addictive way through the first half of the book, then as you carry on further you sense a real change.  I am not going into details but I will say that this change is dramatic, dangerous and potentially deadly.  It is a great twist and one that I really did not expect.

I thoroughly enjoyed this book, it has a great atmospheric darkness and depth that pulls you into a desperate and gritty story.  Where you live makes a difference in how you are treated, the difference between the “have’s” and the “have not’s”, even here the author has introduced an opinion from those that “have”, what you discover is that life is not all that rosy from their side of the fence either.

If you are a fan of 1984, The Hunger Games, The Handmaidens Tale (there are a couple of others, but I cannot give names here as it could potentially be a spoiler), then this is a book you really need to read.  It has a gritty well written plot with a cast of characters that compliment it in a very balanced and well opinionated way.  A book that I would HIGHLY RECOMMEND and also one I am excited and impatient to read more in the series.

About the Author:

Oliver Tidy Author Image.jpgCrime writing author Oliver Tidy has had a life-long love affair with books. He dreams of one day writing something that he could find in a beautifully-jacketed hard-cover or paperback copy on a shelf in a book shop. He’d even be happy with something taking up space in the remainder bin, on a pavement, in the rain, outside The Works.

He found the time and opportunity to finally indulge his writing ambition after moving abroad to teach English as a foreign language to young learners eight years ago.  Impatient for success and an income that would enable him to stay at home all day in his pyjamas he discovered self-publishing. He gave it go. By and large readers have been kind to him. Very kind. Kind enough that two years ago he was able to give up the day job and write full-time. Mostly in his pyjamas.

Oliver Tidy has fourteen books in three series, a couple of stand-alone novels and a couple of short story collections. All available through Amazon (clickable link to Am Author Page). Among his books are The Romney and Marsh Files (British police procedurals set in Dover) and the Booker & Cash novels, a series of private detective tales set in the south of England and published by Bloodhound Books. Oliver is back living on Romney Marsh in the UK. His home. He still wakes in the night from time to time shouting about seeing his books on a shelf in Waterstones.

For more on Oliver Tidy and his books, check out his website: Website

Or follow him on: Twitter ~  Facebook

Many thanks for reading my post.  A share or a like would be great.  Or go and get a copy of this book and see what you think 🙂 xx

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#BookReview : The Feed by Nick Clark Windo @nickhdclark @headlinepg @NetGalley

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I am delighted to be sharing “The Feed” by Nick Clark Windo.  I would like to thank the lovely people at Headline Publishing for my eARC via NetGalley.  The Feed is available in various formats from Amazon UK and Amazon US.

Synopsis:

THE FEED by Nick Clark Windo is a startling and timely debut which presents a world as unique and vividly imagined as STATION ELEVEN and THE GIRL WITH ALL THE GIFTS.

Tom and Kate’s daughter turns six tomorrow, and they have to tell her about sleep.
If you sleep unwatched, you could be Taken. If you are Taken, then watching won’t save you.
Nothing saves you.

Your knowledge. Your memories. Your dreams.
If all you are is on the Feed, what will you become when the Feed goes down?

For Tom and Kate, in the six years since the world collapsed, every day has been a fight for survival. And when their daughter, Bea, goes missing, they will question whether they can even trust each other anymore.

The threat is closer than they realise…

My Thoughts:

The Feed is a futuristic look at something that could possibly happen.  An implant that gives wearers 24-7 access to news feeds, people’s lives, their feelings, where physical communication has been taken over by virtual communication. Tom and Kate are the main focus of this story, Tom insists that he and Kate do have time “off Feed” and spend time talking, this is difficult as the feed is so much part of every day life. When the feed collapses Tom and Kate go back to basics, and head into the country.  The story jumps forward six years and they have a daughter Bea.  Things are bleak but they are surviving, but when their daughter in taken they try to find her.  It is this part of the story that explains the details of the feed and what happened.

I will admit to struggling with the beginning of this book, I couldn’t quite see where the story was going and didn’t understand the concept of “The Feed”.  But I could see that there was something about it that intrigued me more than just a little bit.  I am glad I persevered with this book as suddenly it started to come together, things started to make sense.  Once these things started to fall into place I found a really enjoyable read, with some great descriptions of a bleak lawless landscape where people made the most of what they have got.  Tom and Kate I didn’t warm to immediately, but they seem to fit and almost mirror the desolation and loneliness of the land.  When I got the plot I really enjoyed it, it plays well on the fear of an advanced technologically dominated future, one that I am sure many people will see as a definite possibility. I know I do!

Overall this is a good read, a bit of a slow amble along in the beginning, but picks up pace to a satisfactory conclusion, with some good unexpected twists.  It is not excessively heavy on technological terms, Nick has kept it understandable.  A book I would recommend to readers of a futuristic, dystopian, mystery, thriller and science fiction genres.

My thanks to Headline Publishing Group and NetGalley for my eARC of this book.  My views expressed are my own and are unbiased.

Many thanks for reading my post, if you liked it please give it a share.  Better still go and buy a copy of this book xx

#Book Review : Interpretation by Dylan Callens @TheNitzsch

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Synopsis:

Carl Winston awakens to find his son, Liam, screaming with fear. Trying to understand why, Carl tries to soothe him. Neighbors gather in front of Carl’s apartment to help – until they see him. The crowd cowers back, afraid of this monster. 

Carl runs. His life of luxury is ripped away. Forced beyond the city limits, Carl sees a land bereft of life. Traveling in search of answers, his quest comes to a sudden halt when he collapses. As darkness shrouds him, a figure hovers from above. 

Traveling along the same route, Eva Thomspon finds Carl and nurtures him back to life. Together, they continue the journey, finding out that their lives have too much in common to be a coincidence. As their affection for each other deepens, an unknown nemesis attempts to remove their only source of happiness – their love for each other.

Interpretation is a dystopian fiction that explores hope and happiness in the bleakest of conditions and what happens when it’s torn away.

My Thoughts:

This is a dystopian novel set in America.  All is good for Carl and Liam, living the “American Dream” with all the mod cons and living in essence the perfect life.  “Too Good To Be True” is a phrase that jumps to mind.  When Carl starts experiencing random memories, he knows something is wrong, especially after one such episode causes a blackout.  When he awakens he realises things are not as he thought, his first thoughts are for his son, Liam.  But Liam is scared of his dad and will not come anywhere near him. Carl needs answers, why has this happened and what is going on?  His only clue is to travel north for answers.  It is on this journey he meets and befriends Eva, she is also in the same situation as Carl. Together they will find out the truth.

Technology and advancement of it are the basic premise of this plot, how we are so reliant on technology.  It is similar to plots that have been played out in many books and films over the years.  It has a feel of H.G. Wells and George Orwell but with an almost cinema-graphic feel to it, like Westworld or the Matrix.

The one thing I really liked was the way the book was laid out, chapters between Carl and his journey alternated with that of a computer system running protocols, bios and updates.  I don’t want to say too much about this for fear of spoilers.  It is set at a very good pace, and I found it a very addictive page turner.

This is a psychological dystopian novel.  It does a very good job of playing on technological fears for the future, as well as discussing human perceptions, ir their Interpretation of what they believe.  This is something that has been discussed for decades, and I am sure for more decades to come, as our advancement in a computer based systems increases then so does our reliance on it.  The story of Carl, Liam and Eva has been very well intertwined into the story, and the fact that the reader learns what is going on, often before the characters.

I think this is a book for people who like dystopian genres.  This for me has the feel of a modern story but with classic science fiction roots.  It was a very enjoyable read.  I would like to thank the author for bringing this book to my attention. My thoughts expressed here are honest, unbiased and my own.

 

Dylan Callens’ Bio:

smallerprofilepicdylancallens

Dylan Callens lands cleanly. That would be the headline of a newspaper built with an anagram generator. And although Dylan is a Welsh name meaning god or hero of the sea, he is not particularly fond of large bodies of water. His last name, Callens, might be Gaelic. If it is, his last name means rock. Rocks sink in the sea. Interestingly, he is neither Welsh nor Gaelic, but rather, French and German. The inherent contradictions and internal conflict in his life are obvious.

Purchase Links:

Amazon:  https://www.amazon.com/dp/B073V7LSRV

B&N:  https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/interpretation-dylan-callens/1126732112?ean=2940154727843

Kobo:  https://www.kobo.com/ca/en/ebook/interpretation-7

iBooks:  https://geo.itunes.apple.com/us/book/interpretation/id1258997726?mt=11

 

Author Links:

Website:  www.cosmicteapot.net

FB:  https://www.facebook.com/heaveninctheseries/

Twitter:  https://twitter.com/TheNitzsch

Goodreads:  https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/14739202.Dylan_Callens

Amazon Author:  https://www.amazon.com/Dylan-Callens/e/B01C6KR8P6/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

Many thanks for reading my post.